14 Wow-Factor Kitchen Extensions

Take a look at these inspiring kitchen extension projects of all different styles and designs
by Build It
22nd January 2020

A sensitively designed extension can provide you with a modern, functional space that adds real value to your home. This handpicked selection of projects showcases the range of options available – could something here spark inspiration for your build?

1. Light filled makeover

In this transformation of the rear of a Hertfordshire property by Atelier Architecture + Design, a new light and airy open-plan space has been created.

Open plan kitchen renovation

The single storey rear and side extension includes full length sliding glass doors, allowing there to be seamless connectivity with the outside and plenty of natural light to flood into the home. Modern fittings by Kitchen Matters and a neutral colour palette of warm greys and browns complete the scheme.

Learn more: 7 Ways to Upgrade Your Garden 

2. Period revamp

LBMV Architects was tasked with turning a 161m² four-bedroom, grade II listed flat into a comfortable three-bedroom home with generous living space. A rear extension enabled the creation of a large open-plan kitchen, while sliding glass doors allow the option of alfresco entertaining in summer.

Period home with glass renovation

The expansive glass panels, with their striking black frames, create a bold contrast to the traditional Victorian brickwork and establish a statement focal feature that can be enjoyed from the garden. The sympathetic modern design also ensures that the interaction with the listed building is minimal, with clear boundaries between old and new.

3. Blending old and new

Riach Architects was appointed to extend this gorgeous home located on the edge of the Blenheim Estate and the Cotswolds area of outstanding natural beauty.

The contemporary addition provides a stunning day room connected to the existing kitchen for the family to relax and socialise in. Vaulted ceilings lend the space real wow factor.

4. Industrial charm

Extension with glass walls

In this beautiful split level family home, the team at Thomas & Spiers Architects redefined the ground floor to create areas for relaxing, eating and entertaining, while keeping a feeling of connectedness. The project’s materials palette utilises varied textures. Steel frame doors join the inside and external zones.

5. A floating finish

This grade II listed property was formed of an amalgam of three parts constructed in different eras: the initial 15th century oak frame house, a Georgian facade and two Victorian wings to either side of the original structure. Ashton Porter Architects worked to complement this clear historical sequence with a fourth element that is unashamedly contemporary.

Extension with glazed wall

Slender steel framing, aluminium cladding, glazed white bricks and structural glass make up the addition, which is rotated away from the residence to frame the views into the valleys and Souths Downs. A floating aluminium and sedum roof finishes the scheme.

6. Level up

This house had been extensively modified in the 1980s. Studio Octopi was brought on board to design an extension, while recapturing and preserving the original proportions of the Georgian terrace building.

Tall infill extension

A 10m high glass infill addition forms a double height living room at the lowest level and a master ensuite on the upper level. An open tread stair allows views out while moving between levels. The new sections were clad in bricks that match the existing ones, improving visual connectivity with the main property.

7. Statement piece

This newly-formed dining space has a modest footprint of 10m2, but combined with a loft extension above creates a distinctive look. Filled with innovative ideas from architects Alma-nac, it transforms the rest of the house, too, allowing for layouts to be reconfigured and encouraging an abundance of light to flood in.

Rear kitchen extension at dusk

A 3m high glazed pivot door, protruding up from the sloping roof, creates a theatrical link with the rear garden, adding a sense of grandeur to the small yet practical London abode.

Learn more: 9 Inspiring Conversion Projects

8. Expansive glazing

The owners of this London home wanted to create a large open-plan culinary space that was more sociable and took better advantage of the west-facing sun. Whiteman Architects took on the project.

Extension with glazed roof

The ceiling was used as a way of zoning the new room – a small section of overhead vaulting along the length of the addition creates an area for a kitchen-diner, which then wraps round into a larger vaulted ceiling for the living room. A full-width roof window enhances the sense of height and space while retaining the identity of the existing period property.

9. Modern revision

Previously dark and cramped, the ground floor of this 1970s home suffered from a convoluted layout with petite fragmented rooms.

Modern kitchen extension

To rectify this, OB Architecture opened up the kitchen, dining room and utility and extended it into the garden to create a large kitchen/dining area with a raised snug to the side, providing a light and spacious zone for the whole family to enjoy together.

10. Elegant overhaul

This grade II listed building, once plagued by heavy window frames, poor thermal performance, limited views and a leaking skylight, has been upgraded with an elegant, virtually-frameless glazed composition by Space Group Architects. The interior has been opened up to enable a better flow of light, function and circulation and new concrete finishes act as a surprisingly warm backdrop for the other materials within the scheme.

Elegant kitchen extension

A large stainless steel kitchen storage wall enables light to bounce back into the space. On the opposite side, a backlit etched glass wall conceals a larder under the stairs. To finish the look, bespoke oak joinery has been carefully inserted and wrapped around the newly created zones, softening the new addition’s overall feel.

11. Practical remodel

This late 1950s four bedroom semi has gained a large single storey full width rear extension along with a garage conversion. The contemporary style addition by Model Projects incorporates a new open-plan kitchen dining and family area leading out onto the rear terrace.

Rear kitchen extension

The addition features a flat roof with rooflights and full height glazing that maximises the views outside. A combination of grey brick and timber cladding externally breaks up the rear facade. The garage was replaced with a home gym, allowing for bike storage and a workout area.

12. Minimalist materials

Previously, the rear garden of this Victorian terraced house was only accessible through a small doorway off a utility room. IBLA Architects removed the rear walls, existing bedrooms and staircase and relocated the kitchen downstairs from the upper level, adding a new plywood kitchen island.

Kitchen extension

The glazed infill side extension brings light into the middle of the floor plan and a new stair hides ample storage in the form of pull-out larder units, leading up to a family bathroom in place of the old culinary space.

13. Keeping the character

Feneley Studio completed this extensive renovation to a five bedroom home – extending it both horizontally and vertically. The remodelled staircase area is flooded with light and leads onto new bedrooms housed within the roof extension.

Rear kitchen extension

On the ground floor, the rear addition provides the family with a large kitchen and dining area, with utility spaces hidden to the side. A polished concrete floor ensures a good flow between the different zones, and bespoke rooflights capture the morning and evening sun.

14. A link to the past

David Blaikie Architects was challenged to create a new cooking/eating area that formed a link between the basement storey and the small east facing garden of this traditional Georgian home.

Rear glazed extension

The team controlled the transition from historic building through to the outside space by retaining one of the original outhouses and creating a new addition, with a sequential internal arrangement so that the use of the building changes as you move through towards the garden.

Main image: Atelier Architecture + Design

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